Why Does My Cell Phone Take Pictures by Itself?

No. This is not an episode of "Beyond Imagination", and you've found that your smartphone is taking photos by itself, without your command or consent. Something needs to be done before this paranormal phenomenon backfires on you.

In this post, we'll find out why this is happening, and present some of the possible solutions to resolve the abnormality. Leaving the phone as it is is too dangerous, and if you've made it this far, you're not willing to ignore this problem.

 

It could be a virus that accesses the smartphone camera



It's most likely.

Some virus or malicious application has gained access to the smartphone camera and is controlling the image registration and activation system. This is more common than it sounds, and at the same time, it is potentially dangerous as it can violate your privacy.

The good news is that Android's security fixes minimize the chances of an issue like this persisting. Anyway, if you still haven't updated the device with the fix that solves the problem, you can work around the situation with the steps below:

  1. Uninstall apps you didn't install from the Google Play Store.
  2. Clear your device's cache memory with Google Files.
  3. If the problem persists, hard reset (or factory reset) your smartphone.

On the other hand, some device features may cause the smartphone camera to be triggered accidentally. It is worth taking a look at these items to modify the settings that could result in this abnormality.


The double click that turns on the camera



Some smartphone manufacturers offer custom commands for triggering the camera, such as two clicks on the power button. This can result in accidental photo shooting. It is worth accessing the photo log application settings and disabling this function.


Pocket mode disabled



As an additional feature to prevent accidental shooting, in addition to disabling the function that activates the camera by double-tapping the on/off button or volume control, it's also worth activating pocket mode, which prevents accidental screen taps when the device is stored in your pants pocket or even in your purse or backpack.

Depending on the material that is in contact with the screen, the device may be activated, recording involuntary touches. Here, it is important to note that the device's proximity sensor needs to be fully operational. Otherwise, it will be useless to activate this mode.


Conclusion

As you can see, the problem of voluntarily and randomly registering photos can be approached from two very different fronts.

On the one hand, your smartphone may have a virus or malicious application affecting the proper functioning of the camera, and it is essential that you identify the root cause of the problem and take the necessary measures to remove the installed threat.

On the other hand, your smartphone's adjustments may be to blame for the abnormality. In this case, the problem is much simpler to be solved: just a little patience to modify what is necessary, and the phone will work again without any major problems.