Grandpa deposited $ 70,824 to the wrong account and all his money was stolen; the bank does nothing

Sometimes we forget that banks are companies that hardly see for the welfare of their clients and that they commonly operate under harsh jurisdictions, which allows them to separate themselves and avoid any problem that has to do with the funds of their clients.

This is the case of an 88-year-old man who lost all his savings by making a wrong number when making a transfer of $ 70,824. The sum was directed to a moving company, but Gordon Layton misspelled the account. The man reported his mistake to the receiving bank (Australia and New Zealand Banking), but they told him that the money had already been withdrawn and nothing could be done.



Now this retired grandfather from Queensland, Australia, has run out of savings, and the moving company threatens to take away the house he had just moved into. Despite the fact that his daughter Jackie Morrison reported the error in less than three hours, the ING and ANZ banks have separated, so father and daughter have launched a lawsuit against both banking institutions for malpractices and another for theft against the man who collected payment from Layton.



The fight against the bank began over a house that is obviously rustic and poor and against a man who was not a tycoon. Layton's daughter commented on this:

Two big banks make a ton of money every year for their shareholders. The little retiree makes a mistake, and they have raised their arms in the air and say, we couldn't help you.



You can argue a lot against Layton's human error or praise and defend the protocols of banks simply for being companies designed to handle money, but that it is an injustice that cannot be denied, because the feeling when reading news like this is clear.

Hopefully, things work out in the best way for the retiree, if not, as always, some folks are joining forces to cover Leyton's debt.