Swedish parents try to name their son' Vladimir Putin', but the government forbids them

When giving babies strange names, such as superheroes or something even stranger, became a fad, the authorities of several countries decided to prohibit parents from doing so due to the ridicule and accusations that children could suffer throughout their life. Although they claim that it is their right to give their children whatever name they want, they must first go through a filter so that the authorities in charge define whether or not they can use that name.

Recently, a couple came to Sweden to register their son as "Vladimir Putin", as the president of Russia is called, but the committee that reviews these cases decided to deny them the registration of their baby, unless they chose another name, because that of the president "could cause him psychological damage."

To register a baby, the Swedish Revenue Agency must review the name they have chosen and approve it, otherwise the process cannot be carried out, and another name will have to be found. It is about preventing the child from bearing an offensive name or referring to characters that are not so pleasant in the story, such as baptizing someone as "Adolf Hitler."


The names to choose cannot be offensive or cause future problems for the newborn.

-Swedish Tax Agency



It is not the first time that a controversy like this has been presented, because several years ago several "innovative" parents arrived, wanting to use names like "Allah" and another couple who wanted to register their daughter simply as "Q," but they did not know they allowed me. In 2007, a couple won a lawsuit in the Swedish court not to ban the use of the names "Metallica" and "Google."

In this case, the authorities point out that using the name of the Russian president can cause "potential psychological harm" in the child. However, parents consider Vladimir Putin to be a character worthy of admiration, and that is why they want their son to bear that name.



The Swedish Tax Agency did not clarify what their criteria were for not allowing the Swedish child to bear the name of the Russian president, but since they are the ones who decide, parents will have no choice but to find another name, or travel to Russia and register it in that country, where they will surely have no problem doing so.